Singles Club Top 3 // October 2018

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This month’s edition of the singles club featured 8 tracks from Windsor and Detroit, and our programmers played their favourites over the past four weeks, resulting in the following top 3:

1. BlueFlowersLook At Yourself (Detroit)

2. Poor Playe- Go (Detroit)

3. Disaster Strike - Wake Me (Windsor) 

 

Want to submit your track to the December compilation? Get all of the details here! 

Freedom Principle Black History Month Special: Cumbia in Colombia

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With respect to February’s Black History Month, The Freedom Principle presents four programs of musical genres borne from diverse origins. In doing so, we continue a tradition here at CJAM of recognizing the contributions to the arts of peoples from the African diaspora, experiences which impact and help define our global culture. Click for more information on the first, second, and third parts of the series.

Cumbia left the countryside of the Atlantic coast in the 1940s, moving to the urban centres to become the dance of the middle and upper class. Its distinctive loping beat entrenched itself as distinctly Colombian. The Discos Fuentes label was started in 1934 by Don Antonio Fuentes. The label grew to include everything in-house – the recording, the pressing, cassette manufacturing, printing and distribution. The label remains the oldest and still largest label in Colombia. Discos Fuentes continues to work their back catalog, releasing and re-releasing various compilations and combinations all the time, often with album covers which attempt to project a certain sexuality. The effort on the covers, however, is mute to the dynamic grooves that pop from the tracks of the great cumbia rhythms within.

Cumbia in Colombia airs live on Friday February 28, 2014 from 5:00-6:30pm.

Black Cinema on Soundtrack Attack (Black History Month)

 

Tune in to The Soundtrack Attack on Tuesday, February 18th from 1-2:30PM for a look at the music of black cinema. The show is exploring the early history of race and racism in film and continuing into early black independent cinema. Take a look at how the Civil Rights movement affected Hollywood and some of the first Black films in Hollywood. The show focuses on Blaxploitation, this history behind it, and the music that defined the genre.

Freedom Principle Black History Month Special: Congolese Rumba – The Rhythm of Independence

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With respect to February’s Black History Month, The Freedom Principle presents four programs of musical genres borne from diverse origins. In doing so, we continue a tradition here at CJAM of recognizing the contributions to the arts of peoples from the African diaspora, experiences which impact and help define our global culture. Click for the first part and second part of the series.

The backlash of Cuban son montuno across the Atlantic had a profound impact on the African continent. Nowhere was this more the case than Belgian Congo where it played a strong role during the Congo Crisis (1960-1965) and after independence. Pioneered by Joseph Kabesele (Le Grand Kalle) who composed “Independence Cha Cha” and nurtured by the sorcerer of the guitar, Franco Luambo and his T.P.O.K. Jazz, Congolese Rumba stormed the continent to be adopted in countries from Kenya to Cameroon. The music represented an Africa free of colonial rule and served as evidence of the excellence which could be derived from Africa’s own in expressing freedom from oppression.

Discover the sounds of Congolese Rumba Friday February 21, 2014 from 5:00-6:30pm.

Revolution Rock Celebrates Black History Month: Grant Greens’ Solid

Grant Green SolidFebruary is theme month once again for Revolution Rock! For more information, visit the always intriguing and informative, Revrock.blogspot.ca. Click to learn more and listen to the first and second part of the series.

Grant Green is often viewed as an unsung hero of Jazz guitar and was very underrated during his lifetime. Green has been on a multitude of recordings both as a sideman and solo artist, which were primarily released through the Blue Note label. Solid was one of two albums recorded in 1964 (the other album being Matador), yet they remained unreleased during Green’s lifetime. The musicians on Solid were pianist McCoy Tyner and drummer Elvin Jones, both of which made up two thirds of John Coltrane’s rhythm section. Some felt that this album contains some of his Green’s finest work, but it remained unreleased for fifteen years before getting a proper release in 1979. This episode of Revolution Rock will feature a selection of tracks from this album, as well as a mixture of other genres in celebration of Black History Month.

Check out this episode on Tuesday February 18th, 2014 from 10:30AM to noon.

Freedom Principle Black History Month Special: Chimurenga (Music of Struggle)

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With respect to February’s Black History Month, The Freedom Principle presents four programs of musical genres borne from diverse origins. In doing so, we continue a tradition here at CJAM of recognizing the contributions to the arts of peoples from the African diaspora, experiences which impact and help define our global culture. For the first part of the series, Desert Blues – A New Generation of Griots, click here.

In 1970s Rhodesia, a cultural reawakening occurred which brought pride back to the Shona majority. The cry of revolution against the British administration was led by the music of Thomas Mapfumo. Recorded in the midst of a guerilla war to overthrow the white minority leadership, the soundtrack was released as “Hokoyo!” meaning “Watch Out!” Borrowing from traditional Shona songs, Mapfumo transcribed the sounds of the mbira (African thumb piano) to guitar and the tripping rhythms of the hosho (cowrie shells tied around the ankle) to the drum kit hi-hat. The resulting ‘Chimurenga’ music (chimurenga means struggle) propelled a revolutionary war resulting in independence. Free elections were held in 1980 followed by a celebratory performance by one Bob Marley in the newly established Zimbabwe.

The Chimurenga (Music of Struggle) Special airs on Friday February 14, 2014 from 5:00-6:30pm.

Revolution Rock: City Slang – Music From Detroit

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February is theme month once again for Revolution Rock! For more information, visit the always intriguing and informative, Revrock.blogspot.ca. To learn more and listen to the first part of the series, click here.

Detroit, Michigan and its surrounding areas have often delivered a variety of highly influential music in a variety of differing genres. This program will focus on some of the music to have come from Detroit, Michigan, and the surrounding areas. The program will focus primarily on Garage Rock and related sub genres, but will also feature some of the differing genres and styles of music to come from the surrounding cultural hub of artistic diversity that is commonly referred to as Detroit. Expect to hear music from MC5, The Stooges, White Stripes, John Lee Hooker and more!

Listen to the special on CJAM 99.1FM and www.cjam.ca on Tuesday, February 11th from 10:30AM to noon.

 

Freedom Principle Black History Month Special: Desert Blues – A New Generation of Griots

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With respect to February’s Black History Month, The Freedom Principle will present four programs of musical genres borne from diverse origins. In doing so, we continue a tradition here at CJAM of recognizing the contributions to the arts of peoples from the African diaspora, experiences which impact and help define our global culture. The first in the series is Desert Blues – A New Generation of Griots on Friday February 7, 2014 from 5:00 – 6:30pm.

No contemporary music appears as valid to the struggle of freedom than that which currently comes from the desert of north Africa. The tuareg have been in a fight for independence for over one hundred years. The current rebellion, started in 2006, hit a peak in 2012 when armed militant factions of Islamic fundamentalists fleeing Muammar Gaddafi’s Libya brought increased instability to regions in northern Mali and Niger. In communities that were infiltrated, shiria law was established effectively outlawing music. Fearing persecution, many musicians fled to neighbouring countries to continue to record. Consequently, 2013 saw an influx of superb releases feeding a global appetite for “Desert Blues” with lyrics expressing both anger for the unstable political situation and a devout love for their African homeland.